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Making microtonal scales with Scale Workshop 1.0

A new web app called Scale Workshop allows you to design and play your own microtonal scales. You can also tune various other synthesizers with it. It has just reached version 1.0 and is now recommended for use by the wider musician community.

Scale Workshop has these aims in mind:

  • Scale creation. Use the tools to generate and modify tunings automatically, or manually input your own.
  • Import Scala and AnaMark tunings. Yes it works with that amazing 4000+ scale library that’s floating around the internet.
  • Export the most popular tuning formats easily. Converting .scl files and .tun files is fast. It also exports tuning files for Kontakt, Max/MSP and PureData.
  • No installation required. Scale Workshop runs in your web browser on Windows, macOS, iOS, Android and Linux.
  • Free and open-source. The software costs nothing and it is MIT licensed. Volunteers have already contributed new features and bug fixes on our GitHub repository. Feature requests and bug reports are welcome from anybody.

What else does Scale Workshop do?

Scale Workshop puts a polyphonic synth right inside your browser. You can audition and perform your scales by playing with a connected MIDI controller, QWERTY keyboard, or by using the touch-screen overlay.

Convert scl files and convert tun files to various tuning formats. Export formats include Scala .scl/.kbm, AnaMark TUN, Native Instruments Kontakt tuning script, Max/MSP coll text format and Pure Data text format.

Share your scales with other people by copy-and-pasting the URL in your address bar while working on your scale. The recipient will instantly see your scale information and can play it using their keyboard. This is invaluable for communicating your tuning ideas with others, or allowing your musical collaborators to export your tuning in whatever format they prefer. Try it out.

Display frequencies, cents and decimal values for your tuning across all 128 MIDI notes.

List of supported synths

Note that this list is incomplete.

Via AnaMark TUN (.tun)

  • Big Tick Angelina
  • Big Tick Rhino
  • Camel Audio Alchemy 1.x
  • Humanoid Sound Systems Enzyme
  • LinPlug Alpha
  • LinPlug CRX4
  • LinPlug MorphoX
  • LinPlug Octopus
  • LinPlug Organ 3
  • LinPlug SaxLab
  • LinPlug Spectral
  • Mark Henning AnaMark
  • PolyGAS
  • Spectrasonics Omnisphere
  • TAL BassLine-101
  • TAL Sampler
  • TAL U-NO-LX
  • u-he ACE
  • u-he Bazille
  • u-he Diva
  • u-he Hive
  • u-he Zebra
  • VAZ Modular
  • VAZ Plus
  • Virtual CZ
  • Xfer Serum

Via Scala .scl/.kbm

  • amsynth
  • Applied Acoustics Chromaphone 2
  • Applied Acoustics Lounge Lizard EP-4
  • Applied Acoustics String Studio VS-2
  • Applied Acoustics Ultra Analog VA-2
  • Cakewalk Dimension Pro
  • Cakewalk Rapture Pro
  • Cakewalk Z3TA+2
  • Garritan Personal Orchestra 4
  • Imageline Harmor
  • kv331audio Synthmaster and Synthmaster One
  • Key Tuner JSFX Script
  • Madrona Labs Aalto
  • Madrona Labs Kaivo
  • Madrona Labs Virta
  • Modartt Pianoteq
  • padthv1
  • Plogue Alter/Ego
  • Plogue Chipsounds
  • Plogue Sforzando
  • PolyGAS
  • Reveal Sound Spire
  • samplv1
  • synthv1
  • UVI Falcon
  • ZynAddSubFX
  • Zyn-Fusion

Others

  • Max/MSP (via text file you can load into the coll object)
  • PureData (via text file you can load into the text object)
  • Native Instruments Kontakt (via text file you can load into the Kontakt script editor)

A personal note

This has been a labour of love for almost 2 years – I hope that many people will find it useful! If you want to share any work you’ve created with Scale Workshop then I’d love to hear about it.

Now that Scale Workshop is in a stable state, I am going to focus my attention back on composing new music and hosting the Now&Xen microtonal podcast.

 

Open Scale Workshop in a new window

 

amsynth 1.8.0 adds support for microtonal tunings

Of all the software synths in the world, very few of them support microtonal scales. If you are a musician using Linux and open source software then your options are even fewer. It’s for that reason that I want to celebrate the news that amsynth 1.8.0 adds support for microtonal tunings!

amsynth is a virtual analog synthesizer that runs as a standalone or VST, LV2 or DSSI plugin. Its sonic characteristic is similar to other popular digital VA instruments – fantastic for leads, basses and stabby chords. It’s light on the DSP and the controls are very easy to understand, so amsynth will rightfully earn a place in my toolkit once I move my music production machine over to Linux.

Installing

The easiest way to get amsynth if you’re on a Debian-based distro is to add the KXStudio repositories and then install via apt. Assuming you already have the KXStudio repos on your system, simply run the following command:

sudo apt install amsynth

If you’re unable to use the above, download the source for amsynth 1.8.0 and build it.

Tuning amsynth

Once you have amsynth up and running, microtunings can be loaded by right clicking the interface and selecting a .scl file. In addition, you can load up a .kbm file for custom key mappings.

If you need some Scala tuning files (.scl) to play with, generate some with my Scale Workshop browser tool, or install Scala itself. Scala is extremely powerful, though you need to install it to your PC along with all its dependencies.

Full-keyboard microtuning

Developers, TAKE NOTE of what amsynth developer Nick Dowell has achieved here – .scl and .kbm formats are BOTH supported. .scl files specify the intervals in the scale, and .kbm specify the base tuning of the scale, whether it is A = 440 Hz or something else entirely.

Without supporting both of these formats, a synth could barely be said to support microtonal scales at all. I’m so pleased that amsynth gets this right.

The future

Judging by this page on amsynth’s GitHub, it looks like amsynth may become cross-platform in the future. Should this ever happen, then Windows and Mac users would also have access to this nifty, free and microtonal instrument too. I look forward to this and will follow amsynth’s progress into the future.